Blog Launch

Today we launch The St. John’s Cemetery Project blog.

The blog will be an arena for announcing the publication of new biographies on the database, highlighting interesting research finds we are excited about, introducing our contributors and research assistants, and a place where they, too, will be able to participate as guest bloggers. It will also be a place to reflect on “doing” public history, digital history, convict history, and colonial history generally.

As the database is still in its embryonic phase, new features are constantly being added to increase its potential as a research tool as well as its utility to the local community members visiting the St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta site itself. Those new site features will therefore also be announced on the blog along with some discussion about how they might be beneficial to you, whether you are a tourist, an urban explorer, an avid family history researcher, a professional genealogist, or an historian.

The Highlight Reel

Given that this is the inaugural blog post, it is the perfect opportunity to bring everyone up to speed on what has been achieved thus far.

The St. John’s Cemetery Project’s first biography, Jane McManus: The Maid Freed From The Gallows, by historian Michaela Ann Cameron was published on 10 March 2016 and, since then, a further eleven biographies have been published. Nine of the 12 biographies currently available are part of our very first collection, St. John’s First Fleeters; a collection of biographies on the 17 First Fleeters with memorial plaques buried at St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta and a feature essay on the cemetery itself by Judith Dunn, the author of The Parramatta Cemeteries book series.

When historian Ben Vine brought his expertise in the American Revolutionary War to the St. John’s First Fleeters collection earlier this year, the result was two biographies that illuminated the fascinating and surprising connections between the American Revolution and the settlement of New South Wales: Isaac Knight: The Trusty Sergeant and John Palmer: The Purser, The P.O.W.

 

A number of biographies contributed by historian Michaela Ann Cameron provided further evidence of the complex, transnational histories buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta; see, for example, Richard Partridge: The Left-Handed Flogger and David Killpack: The Merry Mutineer, the life stories of two convicts who mutinied on a convict ship bound for America after the Americans had well and truly won the right to their independence from Britain and the right to stop being used as “a sinke to drayen England of her filth and scum.”

Highwaymen Shelling the Peas

“Shelling the Peas,” Charles G. Harper, Half-Hours with the Highwaymen: Picturesque Biographies and Traditions of the “Knights of the Road,” (London: Chapman & Hall, 1908) p.259

See also Michaela’s biography John Martin: The Self-Freed Slave; the story of a man who was likely a black slave in the American colonies and found freedom in Parramatta a lifetime before President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation. Even the biography of convict James Wright: The Highwayman features a link to a naval hero who died as a result of Anglo-French hostilities associated with the American Revolutionary War. These biographies are thought-provoking, because by illuminating these connections between the British Empire’s old domain (America) and what was then the new British domain (Australia) they also reveal how those transnational connections have been obscured. Ben Vine attributes this to the way Britain, America, and Australia have preferred to remember (and in some cases forget) certain aspects of the past over others.

Speaking of forgotten transnational connections, this digital history project has already begun to forge wonderful links across the seas and ignited an interest in the history we share with the motherland! The need to source images for historian David Morgan‘s biography on Henry Dodd, the “Faithful Servant” of Governor Arthur Phillip himself, led us to reach out to Randall Hardy, the webmaster of a website dedicated to Dodd’s own former parish in England: hodnet.org.uk. Not only did the Hodnet – Shropshire website graciously permit us to feature a stunning image by photographer Geoff Potter of the church in which Dodd was baptised, they also featured on their website and social media the story of Dodd; their very own Hodnet man who now lies in Australia’s oldest grave with headstone in situ in the oldest surviving European cemetery in Australia!

And, of course, two major highlights since The St. John’s Cemetery Project was first conceived were the two award ceremonies for the small heritage grants that have enabled the St. John’s First Fleeters collection to be made manifest. The first ceremony, at which the Royal Australian Historical Society (RAHS) awarded $2000 toward the completion of the collection, took place in October 2015. In June 2016, City of Parramatta Council awarded a further $5000 to the St. John’s First Fleeters collection at the ceremony for their community grants.

 

Stay tuned to our blog and our social media accounts, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, to learn when the next batch of biographies for the St. John’s First Fleeters collection are published.

If you’d like to learn more about how The St. John’s Cemetery Project got started and the road taken to make the vision a reality, click here.